Referatai, kursiniai, diplominiai

   Rasti 3 rezultatai

Purpose: to analyze the changes of women’s roles and education, to review critical attitude to the book “The Mill on the Floss”. Mary Ann (Marian) Evans (1819 –1880), better known by her pen name George Eliot, was an English novelist. She was one of the leading writers of the Victorian era. Her novels, largely set in provincial England, are well known for their realism and psychological insight. She used a male pen name, she said, to ensure that her works were taken seriously. An additional factor may have been a desire to shield her private life from public scrutiny and to prevent scandals attending her relationship with the married George Henry Lewes. She was educated at home and in several schools, and developed a strong evangelical piety.
Anglų kalba  Analizės   (20 psl., 513,96 kB)
Erik-Maria Remark
Remarkas gimė Osnabriuke (Osnabrück), Vokietijoje, darbininkų, katalikų šeimoje.Erichas Marija (Paulius) Remarkas jaunystėje mėgo skaityti, svajoti apie kitokį gyvenimą, tačiau smulkiųjų biurgerių aplinka varžė jo norus ir galimybes. ''Galėjai tikėtis nebent pašto viršininko, mokytojo ar vaistininko karjeros''. – rašė Remarkas savo prisiminimuose.
Lietuvių kalba  Pateiktys   (24 psl., 94,62 kB)
"Try it yourself, Holmes!" he has retorted, and I am compelled to admit that, having taken my pen in my hand, I do begin to realize that the matter must be presented in such a way as may interest the reader. The following case can hardly fail to do so, as it is among the strangest happenings in my collection, though it chanced that Watson had no note of it in his collection. Speaking of my old friend and biographer, I would take this opportunity to remark that if I burden myself with a companion in my various little inquiries it is not done out of sentiment or caprice, but it is that Watson has some remarkable characteristics of his own to which in his modesty he has given small attention amid his exaggerated estimates of my own performances. A confederate who foresees your conclusions and course of action is always dangerous, but one to whom each development comes as a perpetual surprise, and to whom the future is always a closed book, is indeed an ideal helpmate. I find from my notebook that it was in January, 1903, just after the conclusion of the Boer War, that I had my visit from Mr. James M. Dodd, a big, fresh, sunburned, upstanding Briton. The good Watson had at that time deserted me for a wife, the only selfish action which I can recall in our association. I was alone. It is my habit to sit with my back to the window and to place my visitors in the opposite chair, where the light falls full upon them. Mr. James M. Dodd seemed somewhat at a loss how to begin the interview. I did not attempt to help him, for his silence gave me more time for observation. I have found it wise to impress clients with a sense of power, and so I gave him some of my conclusions.